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Colored section represents the counties of that region.



WATER is the main attraction of this area. It brings boaters, anglers, water skiers, scuba divers and swimmers in the summer. In the fall, when water from Summersville is unleashed into the Gauley River, it sends whitewater rafters downriver for the ride of their life. It is rich in Civil War history, as are other areas around the state.



RICHWOOD




Now this place is really going to be fun and maybe just a bit stinky. Curious?

Richwood has self-described itself as the RAMP CAPITAL OF THE WORLD. Now if you're like me, when I heard that, I thought of a ramp you might drive up onto.....No, that's not it. This ramp happens to be a plant and it has it's own celebration in the Feast of the Ramson.





This Allium tricoccum is a wild leek or of that family, and it kinda tastes like green onions, sort of. You can eat'em fried with ham and eggs or with potatoes, boiled, stuffed or stewed. If you're adventurous, I guess you could think of any number of ways to cook them. I guess we would have to try them to decide for ourselves, but if we do make sure to drive with the windows open because from what I understand the smell (ramp-like odor) will stay with us for about three days.

The late Jim Comstock, a native of Richwood and known to be somewhat of a prankster, once mixed ramp juice with the printing ink for his newspaper, the WEST VIRGINIA HILLBILLY. He suffered the consequences: a reprimand from the Postmaster General with a stern warning to cease and desist.

I hear ramps are so healthy, that if you drink a tonic made with ramps, you'll be fit as a fiddle. So to celebrate all that healthy eatin' and drinkin', Richwood throws another party every June....it's called the PAST 80 PARTY. Course anyone can come. Whew, looky here. Granny musta got into the ramp juice.

Well, I think we better go buy some good smellin' parfume, and get ready to leave. Don't forget to roll down the windows in the car....




SUMMERSVILLE




The CARNIFEX FERRY BATTLEFIELD STATE PARK commemorates a Civil War battle that had great impact on West Virginia history. Beginning on Sept. 10, 1861,

General William S. Rosecrans
led an attack that forced

Confederate
General John B. Floyd to abandon his position and retreat, under cover of night, into the Gauley River gorge and across the river. The removal of the confederate troops from the area of then-Virginia, eventually resulted in the creation of West Virginia.

Each year in September, about 300 participants revive the smoke and thunder of the Battle of Carnifex Ferry.

Clothing, weapons and campsites are authentic reproductions except for the bullets and bayonets.



BUCKHANNON




(Sniff, sniff) Do you smell something funny? Must be that ramp juice lingering on. Well, we're going someplace now that might help us forget the smell for a little while. This will be the first place of it's kind that we have visited, but they're all over the place. I'm talking about wineries. So here we go to the LITTLE HUNGARY FARM WINERY.




The wine here is made from a combination of honey, apples, grapes and pears. Mr. Ferenc Androczi, speaking in a heavy Hungarian accent, will be proud to tell you about his special signature wine, Melomel. According to Mr. Androczi, if you drink a glass a day, you'll live to be a 150. The thing about this wine is that it might be a little different each year because of the honey and grapes. Now that we've had a taste of wine, I think we'd better leave this fine establishment and move on. I need some air.




JANE LEW

Although we won't be stopping here, I did want to mention the two glass factories in this little town. One is THE GLASS SWAN and the other is MASTERPIECE CRYSTAL.

They make some pretty delicious sounding things, like

crystal kisses.

Or how about some cooling

crystal ice cubes? Sound refreshing?

Well lets go on to our next stop which is....





Weston





JACKSON'S MILL STATE 4-H CONFERENCE CENTER


In 1921, an act of the West Virginia Legislature named Jackson's Mill as the State 4-H Camp, the first such camp in the nation, and it was placed under the care of West Virginia University.

On the grounds you will find a lodge, cabins and dining hall. This is a great place for gatherings and festivals such as the STONEWALL JACKSON HERITAGE ARTS AND CRAFTS JUBILEE.

Also on the grounds you will find the JACKSON'S MILL HISTORIC AREA. Following are a few of the buildings you will see there.


Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson
considered by many to be the greatest commander of the Civil War.

Jackson was orphaned at a very young age, and so spent much of his childhood on his grandparents farm. The sawmill where Jackson worked still stands on the banks of the West Fork River. The 2 1/2 story mill has a foundation of native stone. It is 40 feet square and made of lumber produced at the Jackson sawmill. Power was provided by two horizontal water wheels situated beneath the first floor. It's taken years to restore it...and it's the only remaining structure of the original Jackson family homestead.

The 40-foot square building is now a museum, holding antique tools and artifacts.

Mary Conrad's Cabin was originally located in Roanoke, West Virginia but now calls the camp home.


It serves as a visitor's center and gift shop.

The McWhorter Cabin was built over two hundred years ago.

It has served as post office, church and meeting house as well as home for 37 years to the McWhorter family. This cabin measures 18 feet by 24 feet. (Can you imagine living in something like this with your family?) It has been part of the Jackson Mill Historic Area since 1927.

Well, we're ready to move on to the POTOMAC HIGHLANDS.